Collaborative Experiment at Garner Valley Downhole Array
 

Please check the following link, (http://archive.hpwren.ucsd.edu/Photos/20040819/), related to a recent collaborative experiment using Kinemetrics’ open-architecture Aspen system solution (http://www.kinemetrics.com/aspen.asp)here in the U.S.. You may find the following information useful.

 

The demonstration project was conducted at the Garner Valley Downhole Array, Southern California. The experiment had over 100 channels of data at 200 sps streaming via wire and wireless comm. links into the Data Center where the Antelope data acquisition system software (http://www.kinemetrics.com/product_Content.asp?newsid=122) was running. The data was from permanent boreholes and surface instruments, as well as an array of temporary stations.

 

On the instrumentation side, they had 10 K2's and 30 Q330's (24-bits system at 0.6W of power consumption; http://www.kinemetrics.com/product_Content.asp?newsid=103) operating for this event that was a collaboration between NEES (UCSB, http://nees.ucsb.edu/, UCLA; http://www.nees.ucla.edu/ & http://deerhound.ats.ucla.edu:7777/portal/page?_pageid=54,31445&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL, and UT Austin, http://www.nees.utexas.edu/), IRIS (USArray at UCSD, http://anf.ucsd.edu/), USGS (Memphis), and many other organizations. About 40 students and 10 teachers were able to view the streaming data from the stations throughout the valley as the NEES (http://www.nees.org/) T-Rex Vibroseis truck from UT, Austin, gave them a shake. A number of local newspapers carried the story as well.

 

The project went very well, both from a scientific as well as an outreach perspective.

 

If you would like to learn more on recent KMI project(s) please feel free to contact us.

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